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authorIanOsgood <IanOsgood@web>2010-10-20 16:46:48 (GMT)
committer Portland State Aerospace Society <psas@psas.svcs.cs.pdx.edu>2010-10-20 16:46:48 (GMT)
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parentf6fc5367af1b863703dbdb554a0f65cfe1cfe49d (diff)
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Indonesia's RPS-420
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@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@ We're trying to figure out what the smallest vehicle that will take between 1 -
But we can also come at it the other way: what other very small orbital vehicles actually exist?
-Wikipedia has a [giant list](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_small_lift_launch_systems) of launch vehicles, of course, but they skip most of the interesting "early" tries of the 1950's - 1980's. I've tried to collect a few comparable ones here. The candidates must have successfully inserted a satellite into >= 1 orbit. There are *all* sorts of specs in the comparison which we've ignored here, or that may not really be comparable; this is just an overview of the different launch vehicles.
+Wikipedia has a [giant list](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_small_lift_launch_systems) of launch vehicles, of course, but they skip most of the interesting "early" tries of the 1950's - 1980's. I've tried to collect a few comparable ones here. The candidates must have successfully inserted a satellite into >= 1 orbit. There are *all* sorts of specs in the comparison which we've ignored here, or that may not really be comparable; this is just an overview of the different launch vehicles.[7]
[[!table class="data" data="""
County | Org. | Vehicle Name | Stages | Propellant | M_LEO (kg) | M_launch (kg) | N_liftoff (kN) | Height (m) | Diameter (m) | Notes
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ India | ISRO | SLV-3[5] | 4 | Solid | 40
UK | RAE | Black Arrow[3] | 3 | H<sub>2</sub>0<sub>2</sub>/Kerosene + solid | 73 | 18,130 | 222 | 13.0 | 1.98 | 1971-10-28 took Prospero[4] satellite to LEO.
"""]]
-There are a few other rockets that would fit in the "larger end" of the table: the US [Scout](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scout_(rocket)) and the French 1960's [Diamant series](http://www.astronautix.com/lvs/diamant.htm), for example. I've left them off since they're all about the same or larger than the Black Arrow.
+There are a few other rockets that would fit in the "larger end" of the table: the US [Scout](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scout_(rocket)) and the French 1960's [Diamant series](http://www.astronautix.com/lvs/diamant.htm), for example. I've left them off since they're all about the same or larger than the Black Arrow.
Note that more modern "1st orbital vehicles" are much larger and heavier since they're obviously meant to be upgraded (e.g., Brazil's [VLS-1](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VLS-1) and Iran's [Safir](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safir_(rocket)) ).
@@ -51,6 +51,13 @@ As small as the lambda 4S is, we still have a long way to go to be able to build
[[!img lanch_vehicles_compair.png size=800x800]]
+## Indonesian RPS-420
+
+Indonesia's space agency (LAPAN) is developing a microsat orbital launch vehicle along the same lines as the Lambda, but with the weight savings of modern materials and avionics. The design goal is to orbit a 25-50 kg microsat on a four-stage solid motor launcher, 9.5 m in length with stages 42 cm in diameter.[7] The first stage would be a three engine cluster. The RPS-420 has been in development since 2007, aiming for orbit in 2014. A suborbital version (RX-420) was first flown in July 2009, testing the proposed 1st and 2nd stage engine. Indonesia's suborbital program has already developed and flown avionics with CPU, 3-axis IMU, gyros, altimeter, thermometer, and GPS. Like Lambda, it would launch unguided at an 70ยบ angle of inclination.
+
+* <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RPS-420>
+* <http://www.globalsecurity.org/space/world/indonesia/rps.htm>
+
## References
- [1] <http://www.astronautix.com/lvs/lambda.htm>
@@ -59,5 +66,6 @@ As small as the lambda 4S is, we still have a long way to go to be able to build
- [4] <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prospero_X-3>
- [5] <http://www.astronautix.com/lvs/slv.htm>
- [6] <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rohini_(satellite)>
+- [7] <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_solid-fuelled_orbital_launch_systems>
- [9] <http://www.astronautix.com/lvs/vanguard.htm>
- [10] <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanguard_1>